Sakura Fortune slot

Step into an enchanted world of blossom trees and golden dragons in this 4×5, 40-line slot that follows the journey of a beautiful heroine as she battles evil emperors on her way to untold riches. The game boasts Sakura Fortune Respins, free spins and a mystery nudge feature. Sakura Fortune also marks the debut of Quickspin innovative new Achievements Engine, which generates tasks for players to complete within the game in return for tokens that can be cashed-in to gain access to the game feature. Release date: 11th of April

Comments: This slot does look amazing as we have come to expect from Quickspin. But what we have also come to expect is slots that pay like a dog turd! Is it strange that they should choose to play at €20 per spin for the demo video? Is it just so we can see some wins that look big? We will reserve our judgement until the general release so we can try it for real but it looks like a standard Quickspin slot where you see the reels spin in, think you are in line for 100x bet but end up with a paltry 6x bet win. Whee you basically have to have a screen full of wilds just to stand any chance of getting your money out… We shall see!

Cherry blossom

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
“Cherry Blossom” and “Sakura” redirect here. For other uses, see Cherry Blossom (disambiguation) and Sakura (disambiguation).
Cherry blossoms at the Tokyo Imperial Palace
Cherry blossom tree in bloom at the Pittock Mansion in Oregon
The Miharu Takizakura in Fukushima
Cherry blossoms in Fukushima
Yachounomori Garden, Tatebayashi, Gunma, Japan

A cherry blossom is the flower of any of several trees of genus Prunus, particularly the Japanese cherry, Prunus serrulata, which is called sakura after the Japanese ( or ; さくら).[1][2][3]

Currently it is widely distributed, especially in the temperate zone of the Northern Hemisphere including Japan, China, Korea, Europe, West Siberia, India, Canada, and the United States.[4][5] Along with the chrysanthemum, the cherry blossom is considered the national flower of Japan.[6]

Many of the varieties that have been cultivated for ornamental use do not produce fruit. Edible cherries generally come from cultivars of the related species Prunus avium and Prunus cerasus. Cherry blossom are also closely related to other Prunus trees such as the almond, peach, plum and apricot and more distantly to apples, pears and roses.

Symbolism

A 100 yen coin depicting cherry blossom

In Japan, cherry blossoms symbolize clouds due to their nature of blooming en masse, besides being an enduring metaphor for the ephemeral nature of life,[9] an aspect of Japanese cultural tradition that is often associated with Buddhist influence,[10] and which is embodied in the concept of mono no aware.[11] The association of the cherry blossom with mono no aware dates back to 18th-century scholar Motoori Norinaga.[11] The transience of the blossoms, the exquisite beauty and volatility, has often been associated with mortality[9] and graceful and readily acceptance of destiny and karma; for this reason, cherry blossoms are richly symbolic, and have been utilized often in Japanese art, manga, anime, and film, as well as at musical performances for ambient effect. There is at least one popular folk song, originally meant for the shakuhachi (bamboo flute), titled “Sakura”, and several pop songs. The flower is also represented on all manner of consumer goods in Japan, including kimono, stationery, and dishware.

Cherry blossoms at Himeji Castle, Japan

The Sakurakai or Cherry Blossom Society was the name chosen by young officers within the Imperial Japanese Army in September 1930 for their secret society established with the goal of reorganizing the state along totalitarian militaristic lines, via a military coup d’état if necessary.[12]

During World War II, the cherry blossom was used to motivate the Japanese people, to stoke nationalism and militarism among the populace.[13] Even prior to the war, they were used in propaganda to inspire “Japanese spirit,” as in the “Song of Young Japan,” exulting in “warriors” who were “ready like the myriad cherry blossoms to scatter.”[14] In 1932, Akiko Yosano’s poetry urged Japanese soldiers to endure sufferings in China and compared the dead soldiers to cherry blossoms.[15] Arguments that the plans for the Battle of Leyte Gulf, involving all Japanese ships, would expose Japan to serious danger if they failed, were countered with the plea that the Navy be permitted to “bloom as flowers of death.”[16] The last message of the forces on Peleliu was “Sakura, Sakura” — cherry blossoms.[17] Japanese pilots would paint them on the sides of their planes before embarking on a suicide mission, or even take branches of the trees with them on their missions.[13] A cherry blossom painted on the side of the bomber symbolized the intensity and ephemerality of life;[18] in this way, the aesthetic association was altered such that falling cherry petals came to represent the sacrifice of youth in suicide missions to honor the emperor.[13][19] The first kamikaze unit had a subunit called Yamazakura or wild cherry blossom.[19] The government even encouraged the people to believe that the souls of downed warriors were reincarnated in the blossoms.[13]

In its colonial enterprises, imperial Japan often planted cherry trees as a means of “claiming occupied territory as Japanese space”.[13]

Cherry blossoms are a prevalent symbol in Irezumi, the traditional art of Japanese tattoos. In tattoo art, cherry blossoms are often combined with other classic Japanese symbols like koi fish, dragons or tigers.[20]

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